Summary
Name
Oryza glaberrima
Description

Oryza glaberrima (African rice) is a cultivated grain distinct from its better known cousin Oryza sativa (Asian rice). African rice was independently domesticated ~3000 years ago in the Niger River Delta from its still extant progenitor, Oryza barthii. While lacking many of the agronomic and quality traits found in Asian rice, O. glaberrima is significant for its resistance to many pests and diseases and for its tolerance of drought and infertile soils. Interspecific crosses between African and Asian rice have produced cultivars with improved yield and quality traits, that have been adopted by many African countries to meet the growing need for rice as a staple food. From a scientific perspective the genome of O. glaberrima provides insight into the genetic basis of domestication and other traits by finding commonalities and differences with O. sativa. Similar to Asian rice, African rice is a diploid A-type genome, having 12 chromosomes and an estimated size of ~358 Mbp.

Properties
Division
Plants and Fungi
Lineage
cellular organisms; Eukaryota; Viridiplantae; Streptophyta; Streptophytina; Embryophyta; Tracheophyta; Euphyllophyta; Spermatophyta; Magnoliophyta; Mesangiospermae; Liliopsida; Petrosaviidae; commelinids; Poales; Poaceae; BOP clade; Oryzoideae; Oryzeae; Oryzinae; Oryza
Genbank Common Name
African rice
Infraspecific Taxon
glaberimma
Common Name
African rice
Publication
Publication: 
The International Oryza Map Alignment Project: development of a genus-wide comparative genomics platform to help solve the 9 billion-people question. Current Opinion in Plant Biology, Volume 16, Issue 2, May 2013, Pages 147 - 156. Julie Jacquemin, Dharminder Bhatia, Kuldeep Singh, Rod A Wing
Jbrowse
JBrowse Instance: 
Analysis
Analysis Table
Analyses
NameProgramDate Constructed
Whole Genome Assembly and Annotation of Oryza glaberrima (ENA)Assembly and Annotation Performed by ENAJul 11th, 2018
The Whole African Rice Genome resequencing projectRead preprocessing and mapping was performed using the TOGGLEJan 3rd, 2017